Projects > The Caregivers-

Ruby with her Mother, Virginia
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Savannah with her parents Brian and Jen
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Bea with her Fathers', Daniel and Sauce
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Korin & Keiko with their son Eukiah and future baby
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Dese'Rae & Felicidad with their children Theo & Gus
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Morgan & Francesca
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Franchesca & her daughter Victoria
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
David with his children, Ruby & Knoll
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Meredith
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Sarah & Nicole with their children, Noe & Elliot
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Anastasia and their child Zephyr
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020
Sahara & Stephen on what would have been their wedding day
Wet plate collodion (Ambrotype on clear glass)
8x10" plate
2020

The Caregivers addresses the emotional and physical labor of parenthood and romantic partnership in my community during a global pandemic.

Using an 8x10 camera, the wet plate collodion process (ambrotypes) and the sidewalk in front of my home studio, I make portraits in public space of families and lovers.

Over a series of multiple sessions, I collaborate my subjects to tell intimate stories of how they nurture, support and protect each other. Through gesture, expression, the placement of bodies and the manipulation of perspective, I depict a wide range of queer and heteronormative families who live within walking distance of my front stoop. I use these portraits as a means to explorer caregiving not as a given role for a women but with the context of queer and feminist thought that sees this labor as a radical act.

The work weaves together a narrative of world-building, using public space and the politics of family and intimacy during a period of self-isolation.